Recent things at BR

On Mon March 5 we screened ‘Made in Dagenham’, a2013 dramatization of the 1968 strike at the Ford Dagenham car plant, where female workers walked out in protest against sexual discrimination.

Thurs March 5 we discussed the text Struggle Against Patriarchy

This zine as compiled at the completion of a quarters worth of course work by three students looking to further heir understanding of anarchism, feminism, and social justice. It is meant to disseminate what we have deemed important nformation throughout our studies. This information may be used as a tool for all people, women in particular, who wish to dismantle the oppressions they face externally, and within their own lives.

http://zinelibrary.info/files/afzine.pdf


On Mon March 9, as a mardi gras special  we screened Pride. A 2014 film based on the true story of the U.K. gay activists who worked to help miners during their lengthy strike of the National Union of Mineworkers in the summer of 1984.

On Thurs March 12 we discussed the text:  This is Not a Love Story: Armed Struggle Against the Institutions of Patriarchy

It includes a herstory of the Revolutionary Cells and Rote Zora armed resistance in Germany, an interview with two anonymous members of Rote Zora, and a brief look at Direct Action and the Wimmin’s Fire Brigade.

http://theanarchistlibrary.org/library/ann-hansen-julie-belmas-this-is-not-a-love-story-ar
med-struggle-against-the-institutions-of-pat

On Monday March 16 we screened ‘Bread and Roses’ a film about two Latina sisters who work as cleaners in a downtown office building in the US, and fight for the right to unionize.

At 7m on Thurs March 19 we’ll be discussing the text ‘Refusing to wait’ as part of our weekly reading group.

This essay argues that anarchists can learn from the theory of “intersectionality” that emerged from the feminist movement. Indeed, anarchist conceptions of class struggle have widened as a result of the rise of feminist movements, civil rights movements, gay and lesbian liberation movements, etc. But how do we position ourselves regarding those struggles? What is their relationship to the class struggle? Do we dismiss them as “mere identity politics”?

https://libcom.org/files/refusing_to_wait_anarchism_and_intersectionality.pdf

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